Book reviews

I’m catching up on my reading now that the weather has turned cold. I hope to have something posted every week but bear with me if I miss a week. I post books I enjoyed and want to share. If I didn’t like a book, I won’t post a review. We all have different taste, and someone may love a book I didn’t like. If I see a major flaw or room for improvement, I will try to offer some helpful advice. I appreciate feedback from my books as well. Join me in reading a few good books this winter.

Laura Freeman

 

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Review of Impending Love and Capture

This article was in the Nov. 19, 2017 Sunday Life Section of the Akron Beacon Journal

Events

BOOK TALK: area authors and events Falls author’s latestImpendingLoveandCapture_w11791_med - Copy

Jessica Beecher, last seen in Cuyahoga Falls author Laura Freeman’s historical romance Impending Love & Lies,

survived working as a nurse on the Antietam battlefield with Clara Barton.

Now, in Impending Love & Capture,

Jess is in Virginia delivering medical supplies but dreading her destination, because when she arrives she plans to refuse the proposal of her longtime beau.

Later, returning through Pennsylvania, she stops to help a wounded Union soldier and is shocked to learn that he is an uninjured Reb.

The man takes her prisoner to tend to his sister, who has been accidentally shot as she served in boys’ clothes as his aide. The soldier, Maj. Morgan Mackinnon, tells Jess she must pose as his wife for her safety in the Confederate camp.

Jess comes to like the girl Tootie, and becomes conflicted about her feelings for Morgan when she learns that he attended West Point with her brotherin- law Blake. Morgan wanted to be an engineer, not a soldier. Their sham marriage develops into a real romance.

As in the three previous books in the series, the Beechers’ hometown of Darrow Falls is reminiscent of nineteenth-century Stow and Peninsula. Impending Love & Capture

(354 pages, softcover) costs $16.99 from Wild Rose Press. Laura Freeman will sign Impending Love & Capture

from 1 to 3 p.m. Saturday at Learned Owl Book Shop, 204 North Main Street, Hudson, as part of the annual Home for the Holidays event. 

Review of “For Better or Hearse”

Book review for “For Better or Hearse” by Ann Yost.17339235

Nick Bowman is the proverbial bad boy who returns home to save the family fortune and reputation. Daisy Budd, is the plain sister who falls for him. The romance story is combined with a cozy mystery as Nick and Daisy search for a “blue diamond” and bodies appear in the mortuary turned wedding boutique. Family members with marital problems and crazy citizens who have unique wedding plans add to the zany list of characters that interfere with their love life. I personally thought the older sister’s behavior was forced and not logical and could have been handled differently, but overall, the story worked. Four out of five stars.

HUDSON – Writers have created mystical and magical worlds like Wonderland, Neverland and Camelot to comfort adults and children in times of grief and worry, said Gregory Maguire, the best selling author of “Wicked.” Hiddensee

More than 150 people met the author Nov. 8 at the Hudson Library and Historical Society where Maguire shared his writing experience, and fans could purchase copies of his latest book, “Hiddensee: A Tale of the Once and Future Nutcracker” which imagines the backstory to the classic tale of “The Nutcracker.”

Hiddensee” is a story of hope and intertwines the famous nutcracker with the life of the mysterious toy maker, Drosselmeier, who carves him. 

Written in 1816 by E.T.A. Hoffmann as a story for children, the tale of “The Nutcracker and Mouse King” makes little sense, Maguire said. There’s a lot of digression, and it’s never explained. It’s a “schizophrenic story.”

Then Pyotr Tchaikovsky wrote the musical score and made it a seasonal favorite, he said. Most of the crowd admitted to seeing the annual Christmas ballet.

Maguire said Act 1 was a pretty good story with Clara and The Prince battling the evil Mouse King, but Act 2 was as if a relative “brought out a slide show story from their eight-month vacation trip.”

The dances have nothing to do with Clara or the Mouse King, Maguire said.

Hiddensee” creates a backstory for “The Nutcracker,” much like “Wicked” created the backstory for the wicked witch of the west in “The Wizard of Oz.”

Raised in a strict household, “The Wizard of Oz” was the one movie Maguire and his six siblings were allowed to watch.

I would organize a play around it and cast parts,” Maguire said. “If you take all the music out of it, it runs 12 minutes.”

Then Maguire would mix up the story and add characters such as Captain Hook and Tinkerbell.

If you add something, the story can’t end the same,” Maguire said.

One version of the story had Captain Hook marrying the wicked witch and having “Little Hookin’s and Snookin’s.”

His father was a journalist and his stepmother a poet, and Maguire said he began writing “Wicked” in the second grade.

The story belonged to us, and I played it over and over again,” he said.

Maguire shared early handwritten stories and drawings, which included fires and people falling out of windows.

They were always filled with adventure,” he said. “I liked to save them in the end.”

Maguire was 24 when his first book, “The Lightning Time” was published. He has written 25 children’s books and 10 adult books.

While living in London, he read about a brutal murder, which made him think about the antagonist in a story, he said.

How do people go from healthy to being guilty of murder? Or a monster?” he said.

He thought about the witch in the “Wizard of Oz” who was bad, Maguire said. That meant she was unredeemable, and it was all right to vanquish her.

There was no backstory for the witch,” Maguire said.

He decided to create one and wrote “Wicked” in five months.

It was my first royalty check with more money than enough for two hamburgers,” Maguire said. “I thought they made a mistake.”

His fortune changed at the age of 39 when “Wicked” sold a million copies, he said. Broadway turned it into a musical, which has been performed more than 4,000 times in its decade run and has won 35 major awards, including a Grammy and multiple Tony Awards.

Book review for “Walking Through Fire”

Bookreview for “Walking Through Fire” by CJ BahrWalking Through Fire

This was the first book I’ve read by CJ Bahr but “Walking Through Fire” has me hooked on her storytelling abilities. She takes a story reminiscent of “The Ghost and Mrs. Muir” and elevates it to a thrilling encounter with murdered ghost Simon McKay and a not so Miss demure Laurel Saville with a villain that grows more dangerous with each turn of the page. The supporting characters of best friend, unfaithful ex-boyfriend, and Scottish setting add to the story’s supernatural believability. The love story builds to the shocking series of surprises at the end that makes the book impossible to put down until the last page has been read. For romance, a ghost story, a sexy encounter, and a villain you’ll love to hate, I recommend “Walking Through Fire” and will be looking for others books by CJ Bahr.

Editing your story

Editing your work with editor Jennifer Fisher, speaker at Hudson Library and Historical Society on Sept. 25, 2017.

Self editing your novel – to enhance work, streamline, robust language, create a product to sell

Type of editing

  1. Development (subjective) – what is the big picture, characterization, plot development, and narrative flow
  2. Line editing – focus on prose, word choice, paragraph structure, and sentence flow
  3. Copy editing – check facts, punctuation, and capitalization
  4. Proofreading – eliminate typos

Keep notes on lingering questions or items to check for clarity and accuracy. Review comments from others but stick to your gut instinct. Reread your manuscript.

Narrative voice – Should be unique, consistent, and reader should “hear” the voice.

Setting – When, geography clear, if historical work, introduce to all the customs, mores, and way of life.

Timing – Storyline length, need dates and make clear how much time as passed in the story.

Tense – Most are past tense. All verbs need to be consistent.

Plot – Needs a beginning, middle, and end. Are there too many subplots that distract from the main plot? Can you distill plot to 1-2 sentences? Bring some originality to the story line. Most plots have been written. What makes your story different?

Pacing – Moves along smoothly and evenly. Are the chapters a consistent length? Are there long scenes that take over story line and slow down narrative pace? Does story move along too quickly or confuse reader? The story should slow down at climax.

Characters – How large is the cast? Are all necessary? Are you familiar with the background of each main character? Do you know them? Be aware of names – keep them distinct and not sounding alike.

Point of View – 1st or 3rd person limited. How many characters have POV? Introduce all characters in 1st few chapters and be consistent in how you refer to them. Cycle through POVs regularly. Do not head hop!

Incorporating the unfamiliar – Don’t assume others know what you know. Explain complicated concepts and devices. Example is military terminology, foreign countries, futuristic worlds.

Series or stand alone – If first in a series, drop in element that can be picked up in later books. If stand alone, resolve the plot

The first page – Pulls reader into the story. Make sure the first sentence, first paragraph, first page will entice reader. How many characters are introduced in first page? Sense of setting and mood established.

Give feeling of what to expect in story – Give clear picture of setting, pose questions to create interest. Is the mood scary, suspicious, or upbeat?

The first chapter – Introduce most of the characters, tell the reader what to expect and make them want to read more. A dead body should appear by chapter 3 in a mystery, and a romance should start by page 30.

The ending – Is it satisfying? Is the central plot resolved? Does it wrap everything up?

 

 

 

Writing a young adult novel

Every writer should attend conferences or classes to improve their craft. I attended the 34th Annual Western Reserve Writer’s Conference Sept. 23 at the South Euclid-Lyndhurst branch of the Cuyahoga County Public Library. The event was free and had a variety of workshops and speakers.

What you need to know about the Young Adult market by J T Dutton, assistant professor of English and creative writing at Hiram College and author to two teen novels.

Know the voice of a teen – the want to make their own decisions and stakes are high

  1. Love is first love, crushing love, eternal love
  2. Story about loss – first loss, excruciating loss
  3. Adventure – fate of world hangs in balance

Don’t teach a lesson; celebrate a complex, deeply felt phase of life.

See the world at the teen’s level who has to work out problems herself.

Teens like complicated stories with social problems – characters can be good and bad at the same time.

The protagonist discovers right and wrong for herself.

Use reasoning, humor, and emotion to express teen.

Teens push against the moral code and want to figure right and wrong out for themselves.

They want to take on complex ideas and reason out complex problems.

Maintain playful goofiness of young years mixed with adult philosophy.

The importance of I – The POV should be first person or close third person perspective – the protagoinist speaks to a personal friend or confidant and lays the soul bare.

Create and show inside jokes and language (create slang that only the teens in your story use – don’t copy any real slang because it is outdated quickly.)

When writing as a teen, speak in a distinct language – create private language for them. Language should be consistent and character derived.

Give them a chance to see things differently than the people around them.

Describe an event with teen commentary to show their perspective.

Use present tense or past tense without the long lens of reflection to keep story in now. It should be a recent perspective.

Validate a teen reader’s experience of time and place even when using a historical setting – address present day social concerns or illuminate generational similarities. Ex. “Catcher in the Rye”

Historical novels for young adults – they look at the past in new ways and how to relate to the present. Capture stories not told in history books.

Teens want to see themselves in the book. “Anne Frank” showed her teen experience.

Foreshorten the adult world, minimizing the interference of authority (many protagonist are orphaned in some way) so they are facing problems alone.

Adult character should speak differently from teens. In the televisions show, 90210, the parents were nerds. The kids were cool.

Use verbs that pop – listen to the sounds of language and focus on cadence.

Honor ethnicity and personal origins. Expand ideas about identity using background and roots so that story belongs to everyone.

Use cynicism and snarkiness but understand the ways in which language protects or hides deeper feelings.

Use the honesty of a teen narrator to cut through hypocrisy in their setting, not to diminish or reduce.

The acceptance as closure to a story – narrator understands that life isn’t perfect

The story works through the problem, accepts understanding of self and the world is not perfect.

The view the world as adult in a more complicated way.

 

 

 

Writing a cozy mystery

Every writer should attend conferences or classes to improve their craft. I attended the 34th Annual Western Reserve Writer’s Conference Sept. 23 at the South Euclid-Lyndhurst branch of the Cuyahoga County Public Library. The event was free and had a variety of workshops and speakers.

Amanda Flower book2Amanda Flower explained the difference between a Cozy Mystery and regular mystery.

A cozy mystery usually has a funny title. Amanda’s new book is “Assaulted Caramel.”

  1. A cozy is a subgenre of a standard mystery
  2. Death takes place off stage
  3. Minimal to no sex or violence
  4. Few if any curse words. It’s a sweet book but people are killed in it. It’s similar to Agatha Christie but funnier and sweeter.

Hardboiled mysteries are darker, more graphic and more cynical – Patricia Cornwell is an example

Soft boiled mysteries are lighter and more humorous; they focus on puzzle solving

Elements of a Cozy Mystery or topes, standards for a genre, that a reader expects in that genre. You can break or embrace them.

  1. Protagonist

She is an amateur sleuth and her job is NOT in law enforcement (Stephanie Plum is bond enforcer but not very good at her job.)

A shop is often a setting – garden, candy, etc.

The protagonist has a flaw – what is her damage?

She is a good person who wants to do the right thing but gets into trouble and snoops or meddles.

She thinks she can help by using her skills. She gets involved because of a connection to the person killed.

She wants justice served or she is the main suspect or someone she loves is the suspect

MOTIVATION is everything – she has to have a reason for doing the dangerous task of solving the crime.

  1. The cozy voice

Light and funny, humorous. Shows the protagonist has a life outside of the story – relief from tension.

All mysteries have right or wrong, good or bad and in the end justice prevails.

  1. Supporting cast

Small town with quirky people. Everyone helps or hinders the protagonist – the details of the story. Some kind of animal is in story (some talk) and a sidekick most of the time who is quirky and has the good lines.

  1. Love interest

Single woman 9/10 times her boyfriend is in law enforcement. She needs someone to get info from or someone involved in the investigation. Meet cute (watch The Holiday movie) – first meeting or first time reunited after long absence. Love gone wrong or something wrong with the person for getting involved. Has the tone of Janet Evanovich where Stephanie is a disaster waiting to happen but somehow “gets her man.”

  1. Unlikeable victim

9/10 person killed everyone wanted him dead so you have a lot of suspects. 1 real, 3 suspicious ones and 3 throwaways that are cleared quickly. All have great reasons to kill – love or money. An option for the victim is some redeemable trait.

  1. Lots of Suspense

In all mysteries their livelihood is threatened or a sick family member needs money for an operation. Every chapter should end with a hook to make the reader turn the page. James Patterson has short chapters, but reader keeps reading to find out what happens next.

  1. Red herrings and clues

Clues lead to the killer.

Red herrings lead away from the killer, misdirect and confuse the reader but do not irritate. Don’t leave loose ends. Everything is done with intention and logical. The clues tie the story together and makes sense to the reader.

Trick the reader – they think they know who the killer is but in the end someone else but makes sense. Do not have killer to jump out late in the story. He must be introduced early.

  1. The killer can be likeable or hated.

Sympathetic character is upset and makes stupid decisions to murder someone.

Action has MOTIVATION. He doesn’t kill because of psycho behavior. Killer is a normal person that snaps under stress.

Motivation – son dying and needs money to pay bills. An elected official has gambling problem and used public funds. They make a stupid decision concerning love or money and kill someone to hide mistake.

Killer’s rationalization – he had to kill the unlikeable troublemaker.

How to kill: blunt force trauma; stabbing; strangling; poison

9/10 murder crime of passion but in cozy – plan the murder

  1. Protagonist in Peril

Reach the climax and wrap up in four pages. Once the mystery is solved, end the story. The final setting should be familiar to the reader from earlier in the story. The protagonist has put the clues together and figured out who the killer is but he arrives with gun and she has to get herself and others out of trouble. Protagonist saves herself and others NOT cop or someone else. She’s the heroine.

Mystery subgenres: Golden Age; Police Procedure; Forensic; Private Eye; Thriller

First person is more common – reader finds same clues as protagonist.

80,000 words is common length.

 

 

 

How to get published

Every writer should attend conferences or classes to improve their craft. I attended the 34th Annual Western Reserve Writer’s Conference Sept. 23 at the South Euclid-Lyndhurst branch of the Cuyahoga County Public Library. The event was free and had a variety of workshops and speakers.IMG_9676

Brian Klems of Writer’s Digest Magazine offered suggestions for getting published:

  1. Write a great story with an exciting incident to send the story into action where life as usual changes. The protagonist has clear goals, and the setting puts reader into the story. Use active voice, active verbs, and good grammar.
  1. Get to know editors and agents before pitching a story and make sure it fits the category they represent.
  2. Follow writing guidelines of editor or agent. Look at website for submission guidelines. Send at least five out at a time from your target list.
  3. Write a killer query letter
    1. Introduction with book, topic, and number of words
    2. Pitch or blurb
    3. Similar books and where it fits in their books (find through research)
    4. Qualifications and platform
  4. Have a platform – visibility and show how people can find you with blog, website, Titter, and Facebook
  5. Be kind, useful, and network. Never bad mouth agents or publishers.
  6. Embrace all feedback and don’t let criticism get to you. Move on.
  7. Be the easiest person in the world to work with.
  8. Have more than one idea; ready for alternatives –what else do you have?
  9. Stay positive – lot of rejections

 

 

 

Review of Impending Love and Capture

IMPENDING LOVE AND CAPTUREImpendingLoveandCapture_w11791_med - Copy

Released Sept. 15, 2017 and available at   http://goo.gl/0fBnFq and @wildrosepress

A review by Dorothy Markulis

History and romance fans will find a great deal to love in author Laura Freeman’s latest book, “Impending love and capture.”

This is Freeman’s fourth book in this series about the Civil War and the Union supporting family, the Beechers of Ohio. Freeman manages to weave historical facts with fictional romance seamlessly, making the reader anxious to discover more and more.

“Impending love and capture” follows beautiful Jessica Beecher, a resourceful 17-year-old, through the horrors of the Civil War. The reader is with the fearless girl as she travels through the devastation caused by the war between the states.

The skillful author’s knowledge of the Civil War is astonishing and her telling of the horrors of war brings the reader right into the thick of the carnage.

The book details the horrific results of Americans fighting Americans.

Jessica, just 17, is plunged into the thick of the aftermath of the fighting, treating injured and maimed soldiers. The author makes the reader take the plunge with Jessica – experiencing the sights, smells and sounds of the war.

Jessica’s life becomes incredibly complicated when she is captured by a Confederate officer. Her hatred of war, and all that it entails, is brought front and center when she finds herself falling in love with her captor.

That love, throws her life into turmoil and threatens her very existence. Her views on life, love and the hateful war are forever changed as she fights to save the man she finds she cannot live without.